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A Sampling of Clips for August 23, 2011

* UCSD faculty and staff may obtain a copy of an article by e-mailing the University Communications Office

A Wave of Donations Surfers raise $420,000
for cancer research at Luau and Longboard event

SignonSanDiego, Aug. 22 -- They are central to San Diego’s personality: surfing, the sun, the slap of waves along our long coastline. Eighteen years ago, some clever surfers figured out how to harness the beach culture to create a uniquely San Diego fundraiser for the UCSD Moores Cancer Center in La Jolla. On Sunday, the Luau and Longboard Invitational raised $420,000, putting the 18-year total for the event at $5.4 million. More

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10News, Aug. 21
CBS8, Aug. 21
La Jolla Patch, Aug. 21

Researchers Alarmed at Rise in Hookah Use Among California Youth
Science Daily, Aug. 19 -- Hookah use among California youth ages 18 to 24 is rising rapidly according to a study conducted by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. Researchers say the increased popularity of the hookah -- a water pipe used for smoking tobacco -- may be caused by the social nature of the behavior coupled with the misguided belief that it is less harmful than cigarettes. "This rise is particularly alarming because it's happening in California, a state that leads the nation in tobacco control," said Wael Al-Delaimy, MD, PhD, associate professor and chief of the Division of Global Health in the UCSD Department of Family and Preventive Medicine. "While cigarette smoking has decreased nationwide and in California, reports of ever using hookah have increased, especially among adolescent and young adults. More

UC Physicists Develop Lens-less X-ray Microscope
Jerusalem Post, Aug. 19 -- Physicists at the University of California San Diego have developed a new kind of X-ray microscope that can penetrate materials to see details at the scale of one billionth of a meter -- without using a lens. The images generated from the nanoscale X-ray microscope are by a computer program. In a paper published recently in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the physicists explain that the algorithm is able to convert the diffraction patterns produced by the X-rays bouncing off the nanoscale structures into resolvable images. “The mathematics behind this is somewhat complicated,” says Oleg Shpyrko, an assistant professor of physics at UC San Diego who headed the research team. “But what we did is to show that for the first time that we can image magnetic domains with nanometer precision. In other words, we can see magnetic structure at the nanoscale level without using any lenses. More

Similar story
Live Science, Aug. 19

Sticky Protein Causes Dental Plaque, Say UCSD Researchers
North County Times, Aug. 22 -- If you've wondered how dental plaque hangs on, despite mouthwash, flossing and trips to the dentist, two UCSD chemists say they've discovered a reason. It's an extremely adaptable protein made by a hyper-sticky bacterium. This bacterium, Treponema denticola, makes a protein called "Treponema variable protein," or TvpA. (Discusses research by Partho Ghosh, a UCSD professor of chemistry and biochemistry and , led the research and Johanne Le Coq, who was a postdoctoral fellow in Ghosh's lab and now works at the Spanish National Cancer Center in Madrid.) More

UC Excuse Rings Hollow
North County Times, Editorial, Aug. 23 -- The University of California remains one of the jewels of publicly underwritten higher education in the world. Its 10 campuses, stretching from UC San Diego north to Riverside and all the way to Davis, continue to attract the brightest students not only from our state but from around the world. It also attracts some of the top researchers and teaching faculty on the planet. So when UC administrators played dumb last week, telling state Controller John Chiang that they can't figure out how to determine how much they pay their administrators, faculty and staff in salary and in benefits, it's hard to take that claim seriously. (Mentions San Diego Supercomputer Center.) More

 


 


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