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A Sampling of Clips for June 22, 2011

* UCSD faculty and staff may obtain a copy of an article by e-mailing the University Communications Office

Ten Miracle High Schools
Newsweek, June 21 -- Low-income students, paltry funding, dated facilities – that didn’t stop some schools from doing more with less – and becoming the best in America, according to Newsweek’s annual ranking. (Profiles The Preuss School UCSD as #1 transformative school in the country.) More

Similar story in
San Diego Union Tribune

Driving While Buzzed: No Amount of Alcohol Is Safe Behind the Wheel
Time, June 22 -- The safety of "buzzed" driving has been on the public's mind recently, in light of the death of MTV's Jackass star Ryan Dunn, 34. It's unknown whether or how much alcohol played a role in Dunn's crash. But the new study by two demographers at the UC San Diego, found that drivers who consumed even a single drink before getting behind the wheel were more likely than sober drivers to get into car crashes; those accidents were also on average more severe than those involving sober drivers. David Phillips and Kimberly M. Brewer of the university's sociology department looked at accident and injury data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) database, which tracks every car accident in the U.S. involving at least one fatality. More

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ABC News
ABC News 10
WebMD
San Diego Union Tribune

QE2 Proves No Silver Bullet
 Wall Street Journal, June 22 -- Federal Reserve officials have been warning for months that the controversial $600 billion bond-buying program they initiated last year wouldn't be a panacea for an ailing US economy. That's one forecast they seem to have gotten right. The program -- known as the central bank's second round of quantitative easing, or QE2 -- will end on schedule this month with a mixed legacy, having proved to be neither the economy's needed elixir nor the scourge that critics described. (Quotes James Hamilton, an economist at UC San Diego.) More

An Engineer's Life: 20 Things UCSD's Marc Meyers has Done
San Diego Union Tribune, June 21 -- Poet. Explosives expert. The titles don't seem to go together. But they both apply to Marc Andres Meyers, a materials scientist at UC San Diego. He's primarily an explosives expert, having found ways to improve armor, gauge the reliability of nuclear weapons, and figure out what lasers do to metals. Meyers also is an expert in the emerging field of biomimetics, where researchers design products that mimic designs found in nature. But the 64-year-old Brazilian also is the author of poetry, science fiction, and suspense. More

Nanodrug Swarms Use the Human Body's
Biocommunications System to Coordinate Their Attack

Popular Science, June 21 -- On any battlefield, communication is key — troops must be able to communicate their own locations and that of their target, so everyone knows exactly where to bring the fight. Researchers are bringing this strategy to the war on cancer, training swarms of cancer-fighting nanoparticles to communicate to do their jobs more effectively, resulting in a much more effective onslaught against a tumor. Nanoparticles can travel through the body unimpeded, delivering drugs directly into tumors and lessening the side effects of chemotherapy. To improve this outcome, researchers from MIT, the Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute and UC San Diego designed nanoparticles that can work in teams. More

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North County Times
(Quotes researcher UC San Diego’s Michael J. Sailor, one of the study's authors.)
Bostinnovation

Poor Brain ‘Sync’ a Possible Sign of Autism
Health Day, June 22 -- Researchers searching for an early indicator of autism say they’ve discovered a promising possibility: an impairment in the ability of the brain’s right and left hemispheres to communicate with each other. “No one really knows why synchronization is important, but it’s clearly a robust phenomenon apparent in the brains of animals and humans of all ages,” said lead study author Ilan Dinstein, a neurobiologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, and a member of the Autism Center of Excellence at UC San Diego. “Having biological measures for diagnosing autism would revolutionize the field.” More

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Science News

Three Nobel laureates to speak at UCSD
San Diego Union Tribune, June 21 --Three Nobel Prize winners -- including U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu -- will speak this week at a UC San Diego science center where scholars from many disciplines explore the basic biology of life. Chu, Ada Yonath  and UC San Diego's Roger Tsien, who shared the 2008 Nobel in chemistry, are scheduled to appear at a conference being run by UC San Diego's Center for Theoretical Biological Physics. More

Port History: From Swamp to International Trade Hub
Long Beach Gazette, June 22 -- In 1897, a watershed moment occurred that would open the door to the beginning concepts of the Port of Long Beach: San Pedro won out over Santa Monica to have the federal government develop a deep-water port and construct a nine-mile breakwater. (Quotes Steven Erie, UC San Diego professor of political science and author of “Globalizing LA: Trade, Infrastructure and Regional Development.”) More

Napa Valley Vintners Present Climate Study
San Francisco Business Journal, June 21 -- The Napa Valley Vintners, an industry group of 400 area wineries, is finishing up a four-year study on climate conditions in the region as vintners look at how changing climate could affect their wines.  Napa Valley Vintners got Daniel Cayan, a climate scientist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, to lead the study. More

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The Oakland Tribune

Poor Brain ‘Sync’ a Possible Sign of Autism
Health Day, June 22 -- Researchers searching for an early indicator of autism say they’ve discovered a promising possibility: an impairment in the ability of the brain’s right and left hemispheres to communicate with each other. “No one really knows why synchronization is important, but it’s clearly a robust phenomenon apparent in the brains of animals and humans of all ages,” said lead study author Ilan Dinstein, a neurobiologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, and a member of the Autism Center of Excellence at UC San Diego. “Having biological measures for diagnosing autism would revolutionize the field.” More

Similar story in
Science News

Keel-Laying Ceremony Held for NOAA Survey Vessel Reuben Lasker
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, June 21 – The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association and Marinette Marine Corporation today held a keel-laying ceremony at the MMC shipyard in Marinette, Wis., for NOAA’s newest fisheries survey vessel, Reuben Lasker. The new vessel is named after the late Dr. Reuben Lasker, a pioneering fisheries biologist who served as the director of the NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center’s coastal fisheries division and as adjunct professor at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego. Dr. Lasker directed a renowned research group that focused on the survival and transition of young fish to adulthood, a topic with implications for fisheries management throughout the world. More

Biotech Startups Use Contests as Springboards
San Diego Union Tribune, June 21 -- A trio of nascent biotechnology firms with San Diego in recent weeks have won thousands of dollars in prize money as they’ve moved through the annual circuit of business-plan competitions sponsored by universities and venture capital firms. (Mentions Entrepreneur Challenge put on by UC San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering.) More

Dancing in the Swirl of Skirl
Wall Street Journal, June 22 -- As it is in the organic-food movement, the concept of localism serves as a guiding principle for Chris Speed, a 44-year-old Brooklyn-based alto saxophonist who founded his own recording outfit in 2006. (Mentions Anthony Burr, UC San Diego assistant professor of music.) More

Read to Kids, Just Like Bill Walton
San Diego Union Tribune, June 21 -- Former NBA all-star Bill Walton became the first volunteer in the United Way of San Diego County’s campaign which seeks 10,000 people over the next three years to provide tutoring, mentoring and reading assistance to promote literacy among youth in the region. (Mentions UC San Diego.) More



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