This Week @ UCSD
divider
divider
divider
divider
divider
divider
divider
divider
divider
Top Stories Print this story Print Forward to a Friend Forward

Children of Employees Get Inside Glimpse of
Campus at Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work

By Ioana Patringenaru | May 1, 2006

Take Your Daughters and Sons to Work Day
Children also could practice rock-climbing at the Outback Climbing Center at the Canyonview Athletics and Recreation Complex.

They pretended to be an alien with four heads and one body. They climbed rocks They even got fingerprinted.

Dozens of boys and girls descended upon UCSD Thursday to spend the day with their parents and celebrate Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day. The goal of the event is to get children and parents to think about careers and their future, according to the Women’s Center, which organized the event.

After breakfast on The Hump near the Women’s Center, children with their parents or guardians scattered around campus. By 9:30 a.m., about a dozen had made their way to the La Jolla Playhouse, where teaching artist Lisel Gorell-Getz was waiting with her own son, Owen. The little boy played with a toy train while his mom gave a brief history of the theater. Then Gorell-Getz took Owen in her arms as the group headed to the Mandell Weiss Theatre for a sneak peak at the set for the musical “Zhivago,” which will open on May 10.

Finally, the group got down to business, and Gorell-Getz led them through a series of games that artists use to hone their improv skills. Children and grown-ups first stood in a circle. Gorell-Getz asked them to say their name and come up with a move to go with it. They chose to wave their hands, snap their fingers or punch the air. But when Marlowe Embry’s turn came, the 6-year-old jumped, then landed in a perfect split. That drew admiring “ohhs” from both adults and children. Marlowe is very dramatic, her father, Robin Embry, said later.

“We call her the 6-year-old drama queen,” he said.

Marlowe seems to have a gift for performing and the workshop was a great opportunity to nurture her talents, Embry said.

He later volunteered when Gorell-Getz started another game, where players impersonated cogs in a big machine. Embry hummed and walked in circles. But the game most popular with youngsters seemed to be “Mr. Know It All,” in which four children played the part of a four-headed alien. They answered questions from Gorell-Getz, other children and parents. The catch? Each of Mr. Know It All’s heads could only utter one word at a time. That let to some interesting exchanges. How long does it take you to put your make-up on, someone asked. “It – takes – five – days,” the four heads replied. What is the meaning of life? “The – meaning – of – life – is – death,” came the reply.

After the theater workshop, which also included a play writing exercise, Embry and Marlowe headed out to the crafts center. Anna Jost and her son Shane headed to the police station for another activity. While waiting for a shuttle, Jost had some good things to say about the event.

“It really helps the kids to see where you are every day,” she said.

Shane, 9, said he liked the goodie bag he got, which included candy and a calculator.

By the end of the day, Shane and his mom had made their way to the Outback Climbing Center at the Canyonview Athletics and Recreation Complex, where children took turns at rock climbing on an indoor wall.

Bob Moore talked his daughter Phoebe through the difficult sections of the wall. After several attempts, the 9-year-old made her way to the top, and Moore high-fived her when she came back down. He said he looks forward every year to bringing his daughter to work for one day. And how did Phoebe feel? “Beats school,” she said.

spacer
Subscribe Contact Us Got News UCSD News
spacer

UCSD University Communications

9500 Gilman Drive MC0938
La Jolla, CA 92093-0938
858-534-3120

Email: thisweek@ucsd.edu