News

Patches of Cortical Layers Disrupted During Early Brain Development in Autism

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the Allen Institute for Brain Science have published a study that gives clear and direct new evidence that autism begins during pregnancy.

March 26, 2014General, Health, Science and Engineering

Ferrara Receives Gairdner Prize, Canada’s Highest Honor in Life Sciences

Napoleone Ferrara, MD, distinguished professor of pathology at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and senior deputy director for basic sciences at UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, was named today among eight recipients of the Canada Gairdner Awards at a ceremony in Toronto.

March 26, 2014Awards, Faculty Research, General, Health, Science and Engineering

Brain Differences in College-aged Occasional Drug Users

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered impaired neuronal activity in the parts of the brain associated with anticipatory functioning among occasional 18- to 24-year-old users of stimulant drugs, such as cocaine, amphetamines and prescription drugs such as Adderall.

March 25, 2014General, Health, Science and Engineering

Stem Cell-Derived Beta Cells Under Skin Replace Insulin

Scientists at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute have shown that by encapsulating immature pancreatic cells derived from human embryonic stem cells, and implanting them under the skin of diabetic mouse models, sufficient insulin is produced to maintain glucose levels without unwanted potential trade-offs of the technology.

March 25, 2014General, Health, Science and Engineering

Bariatric Surgery Decreases Risk of Uterine Cancer

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center report that bariatric surgery resulting in dramatic weight loss in formerly severely obese women reduces the risk of endometrial (uterine) cancer by 71 percent and as much as 81 percent if normal weight is maintained after surgery.

March 24, 2014General, Health, Science and Engineering

New Therapeutic Target Discovered for Alzheimer’s Disease

A team of scientists from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, the Medical University of South Carolina and San Diego-based American Life Science Pharmaceuticals, Inc., report that cathepsin B gene knockout or its reduction by an enzyme inhibitor blocks creation of key neurotoxic pGlu-Aβ peptides linked to Alzheimer’s disease. Moreover, the candidate inhibitor drug has been shown to be safe in humans.

March 17, 2014General, Health, Science and Engineering

Mother Delivers Baby, Develops Heart Disease

Three weeks after delivering her first child, Amanda began to suffer from extreme fatigue, headaches, a tight chest and stomach pain. An initial diagnosis of pneumonia changed for the worse: Amanda was experiencing heart failure. She was quickly transferred to UC San Diego Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center where a multidisciplinary team implanted a novel cardiac device under her skin, leaving the heart untouched, to prevent sudden cardiac arrest.

March 11, 2014General, Health, Science and Engineering

Anti-psychotic Medications Offer New Hope in the Battle Against Glioblastoma

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that FDA-approved anti-psychotic drugs possess tumor-killing activity against the most aggressive form of primary brain cancer, glioblastoma.

March 07, 2014General, Health, Science and Engineering

Kawasaki Disease and Pregnant Women

In the first study of its type, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have looked at the health threat to pregnant women with a history of Kawasaki disease (KD), concluding that the risks are low with informed management and care.

March 06, 2014General, Health, Science and Engineering

Vitamin D Increases Breast Cancer Patient Survival

Breast cancer patients with high levels of vitamin D in their blood are twice as likely to survive the disease as women with low levels of this nutrient, report University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers in the March issue of Anticancer Research.

March 06, 2014General, Health, Science and Engineering

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