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Is the Next Big Step in Cancer Therapy Personalized Vaccines?

Tamara Strauss has been living with high-grade, stage IV pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer for more than three years. Current treatments, although effective for her, are highly toxic. Tamara enrolled in a first-of-its-kind, pilot study at Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health to test a personalized vaccine using her unique cancer mutations to boost an anti-tumor immune response.

Is the Next Big Step in Cancer Therapy Personalized Vaccines?

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https://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/is_the_next_big_step_in_cancer_therapy_personalized_vaccines
Is the Next Big Step in Cancer Therapy Personalized Vaccines?
Tamara Strauss has been living with high-grade, stage IV pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer for more than three years. Current treatments, although effective for her, are highly toxic. Tamara enrolled in a first-of-its-kind, pilot study at Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego Health to test a personalized vaccine using her unique cancer mutations to boost an anti-tumor immune response.
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https://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/samsung_licenses_5g_polar_coding_technology_developed_by_uc_san_diego_engineers
Samsung Licenses 5G Polar Coding Technology Developed by UC San Diego Engineers
Samsung and the University of California San Diego recently signed a major license agreement for the telecommunications industry, for a standard-essential error-correction technology developed by engineers from the Jacobs School of Engineering. This new technology plays a key role in the 5G wireless communications standard, where it is used to encode and decode polar codes. Polar codes have been recently ratified as part of the 5G New Radio enhanced mobile broadband (eMBB) standard, with commercial deployments expected in 2019 to eventually penetrate hundreds of millions of wireless devices.
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https://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/feature/welcome-to-the-triton-family
Welcome to the Triton Family
Hector Enriquez first visited UC San Diego when he was 12 years old as part of a summer program. During his free time, he would explore the campus and envision himself as a student. A year later, he learned that if he succeeded in his classes and was admitted to UC San Diego, he could be awarded a Chancellor’s Associates Scholarship, which would cover his full tuition and housing costs. This fall, his dream came true. Enriquez is the first in his family to attend college, and he is already inspiring his siblings to follow in the same path.
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https://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/feature/tapping-untapped-talent
Tapping Untapped Talent
For those on the autism spectrum, getting hired for a job can be a daunting step, especially the interview process. Often, social anxiety and a preference for routine make it difficult for autistic people to communicate their skills and make big life transitions. UC San Diego neuroscientist Leanne Chukoskie recognized an opportunity to help local autistic young adults—an underrepresented population in the STEM field—build their social skills and professional resume.